Slightly Late Challenge 20: Treats

May. 26th, 2017 11:15 am
miss_s_b: (Mood: Surviving)
[personal profile] miss_s_b posting in [community profile] weekly_food_challenge
This week has been a bit rough in a lot of ways* - which is part of the reason for the challenge being late - so I think we all need a treat. You can interpret that word "treat" how you like: tell me your indulgences, your comfort foods, your foods you turn to when everything is awful.

And then we can all feel a bit better reading about them :)



* this is British for "a city near me had lots of its children blown up, politics remains screamingly frustrating, and I have had a horrific migraine", if you're wondering.
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly posting in [community profile] metaquotes
"NEEGATIVE FIVE STARS. What a terrible recipe! I was out of flour but
didn't want to go to the store so I substituted a cup of plaster and a cup of gravel, spray margarine for the cultured butter, and stevia drops for the sugar, and then fried the batter in bacon grease instead of baking it. And I didn't give it the 24 hour rest recommended in the recipe because I'm impatient. The results are INEDIBLE and clearly you CANNOT COOK and should DELETE YOUR BLOG."


Context is tired of stupid recipe reviews.
katstevens: (dogswim)
[personal profile] katstevens posting in [community profile] rglondon
Archie's, Deptford, London SE8
Evening RGLers!

This week's featured article is for Archie's cafe in Deptford, presumably named because it's located in a railway arch and specialises in cheese (cheese sandwiches, macaroni cheese, cheesecake etc) which makes me wonder what their marketing team's crossed-out suggestions were. "Deptford Brie-dge"? "Caerphilly Does It"? "Better The Breville You Know"? All fine names, feel free to use any of them for your own cheese-based establishment.

New to RGL this week is Jashan, a veggie Indian restaurant near Wembley Central. From the sounds of it our reviewer's experience wasn't quite as they'd hoped for - usually Wembley-based disappointments are caused by sport rather than chilli mushrooms, so perhaps Jashan was just having an off day?
el_staplador: A yellow bird is depicted eating grapes in a stained-glass window (om nom nom)
[personal profile] el_staplador posting in [community profile] weekly_food_challenge
Almost ten years ago, I was an au pair for my aunt and her family in a village near Frankfurt am Main in Germany. On one occasion we went to a fair and picked up a bottle or two of Federweisser - very, very young wine. And my aunt made Zwiebelkuchen to go with it. Because that's what you do.

'Every family,' says my aunt, 'has its own recipe.' Hers is a lovely tangly oniony mess on a bread base.

The following recipe is not really Zwiebelkuchen. In fact, the book I got it out of calls it Farmhouse Potato Pie, but to me it's much more about the onions. It's in no way authentic, but I find that it's very evocative. It's a hassle, so I don't make it often, but it's gorgeous, so I do make it sometimes. It's the right sort of hassle (for me, at least): you can do a bit at a time, and go and have a bath while the base is chilling, etc, and the washing up isn't too bad if you do it as you go along.

I usually have it in the autumn, with cider, but it's worked very nicely in May, with a Spanish red wine. So there you go.

Recipe under the cut )
norfolkian: Holtzmann from Ghostbusters licking a gun (Default)
[personal profile] norfolkian posting in [community profile] weekly_food_challenge
I cooked this last night and it ended up not being what I'd planned. We just got back from holiday yesterday and I didn't fancy venturing too far from home, so I popped out to the small local Asda for some ingredients in the afternoon. I'd been planning to do something with spring onions, but the spring onions in Asda did not look very appetising, so I bought some red onions instead. And this was the result.

I've suggested using more spice than I actually put in, because mine ended up being a little on the bland side, but you can adjust according to your taste. You could also make this with thighs on the bone which may help to make it more flavourful - you'll just need to increase the cooking time a little.

Serves 3-4

Ingredients
A small amount of olive oil (I usually use around 1 tsp)
4 large skinless, boneless chicken thighs
2 red onions, sliced
4 garlic cloves, crushed
250g chestnut mushrooms, sliced
1 red pepper and 1 green pepper, cut into strips
2 heaped tsp smoked paprika
1 400g tin chopped tomatoes
salt and pepper to taste
handful of fresh coriander, chopped

Method
Pre-heat the oven to 180C (fan-assisted). Heat the oil in a cast iron casserole dish or a saucepan which can be used in the oven. Add the chicken thighs and cook until brown all over. Add the onions, garlic, mushrooms and peppers and cook for a few minutes until it's all just starting to soften. Add the paprika, give it a good stir and cook gently for about a minute. Add the chopped tomatoes and season with salt and pepper. Give it a good stir, then place the lid on the casserole and then put it in the oven. Cook for 30-40 minutes until the chicken is all cooked through and everything is soft and melty and yummy. Garnish with the fresh coriander. Serve with rice.
moetushie: Beaton cartoon - a sexy revolution. (Default)
[personal profile] moetushie posting in [community profile] weekly_food_challenge
Wah, this challenge couldn't come at a worst time -- my dietitian's forbidden me onions for this month! But I wanted to share this recipe with y'all because onions are so important and I love them a lot. Like the holy trinity in Creole food, onions are also essential to Bengali cooking (along with ginger and garlic.) Growing up, I would watch my grandmother make chingri dopiaza on special occasions -- though onions are the definition of everyday food, shrimp can get expensive.

I think in Bangladesh, they used prawns in this recipe, but in the US, I use shrimp because that's what's easily available. (Please don't put me on the spot about the differences between shrimp and prawns -- I know there are physical differences, but there's also the divided by a common language thing.)

Recipe under the cut. )
miss_s_b: (Mood: Smug)
[personal profile] miss_s_b posting in [community profile] weekly_food_challenge
I'm not going to lie to you guys, caramelising onions takes ages. I'm one of those people who can't eat immediately upon getting up, though, and the hour and a half or so that this takes is enough for me to work up an appetite.

recipe and lots of photos under the cut )
Here's a pic of my breakfast:

full_metal_ox: (Default)
[personal profile] full_metal_ox posting in [community profile] metaquotes
[personal profile] psychopathicus_rex and [personal profile] icon_uk debate the definition of "folklore":

PSYCHOPATHICUS_REX: Not to be pedantic, but (werewolves being vulnerable only to silver bullets) is strictly Hollywood - any old bullet will do. Don't muck up your folkloric credentials now!

ICON_UK: As folklore is more or less completely made up, I fail to see how Hollywood isn't as valid a source as anywhere else, considering how humans everywhere always LOVE turning things into stories.

PSYCHOPATHICUS_REX: Well, the way I look at it, Hollywood folklore is stuff you KNOW is made up - traditional folklore has generally been around for a long time, and at least stands a chance of being true. Personally, I'm a bit of a mystical type by inclination, so I prefer to give it the benefit of the doubt.

ICON_UK: I think I'm more of a Granny Weatherwax type in such things. Folklore is lore told by "folk", and how reliable have people you think of as "folk" ever been? :)

Context discusses magic, headology, and Gen-X British comics fans' Friend On The Other Side.

Challinj #19: Onions

May. 17th, 2017 02:35 pm
miss_s_b: (Default)
[personal profile] miss_s_b posting in [community profile] weekly_food_challenge
Onions are the base for so many sauces, stews and curries it's ridiculous. Like, almost everything savoury can be made with onions in. There are also recipes that allow onions to shine out as a main flavour - French onion soup, onion tart, onion chutney. So there's a decent breadth of possibility this week, I think.

I'm sure you guys can show me some awesome recipes. I'm sure you... know your onions.

* I-made-a-terrible-joke proud face *
miss_s_b: (Hobby: Scrabble)
[personal profile] miss_s_b posting in [community profile] weekly_food_challenge
tl;dr: use the oven and lots of butter.

Your options for this breakfast are:
  • sausages (meaty or veggie)
  • mushrooms
  • soft sliced onions
  • hash browns
  • black pudding
  • fresh tomatoes (not tinned, though)
  • baked beans
  • bacon (or facon for vegetarians)
  • fried bread
  • toast
  • fried eggs
this is how I do it )
I am aware that some people prefer scrambled eggs rather than fried for breakfast; that's not really practical with this breakfast, what with everything else that's going on, but you can check out a scrambled egg recipe here (good set of comments on that post too).
ewan: Star (Default)
[personal profile] ewan posting in [community profile] rglondon
Hello and welcome back as RGL takes you to...

The Teapot, Forest Hill, London SE23

Leafy Forest Hill, where our featured article, cafe Teapot, SE23 3HF, awaits you. It's not big, but it will do you a good panino, and child-friendly portion sizes if you have children with you, which you may not.

There's a new entry for Jackson and Rye, a chain bar/restaurant in Richmond. I know there's one in Soho, as I've walked past it many times, but that's not a review. You can follow the link for that but be warned, there is a distinct lack of blueberries.

Finally, the reported permanent closure of Matsuri, a teppanyaki restaurant in St James's, by Piccadilly. You might miss some of its excellent food, but you won't miss the prices.

Fancy schmancy breakfast

May. 14th, 2017 09:02 am
missdiane: (Kitty Chinese food)
[personal profile] missdiane posting in [community profile] weekly_food_challenge
I used this challenge to make a decadent breakfast as a treat. Y'know, the kitties had to wish me a Happy Mother's Day somehow.

I did a spin on the traditional eggs benedict, using salmon instead of canadian bacon/ham and adding some other bits and bobs (some out of necessity). I hadn't tried it before but this pastrami-style smoked salmon looked yummy at TJ's - and BOY was it yummy.


 
 
I had intended to also use Trader Joe's crumpets but I really must stop buying them anymore. They have a tendency to quickly grow mold no matter how you store them. I'd only purchased them on Thursday and yep, little green spots already. I had a tube of buttermilk biscuit dough in the fridge that I'd intended to use on something else but it had to do - and it did very well. I did have a loaf of nice bread I purchased yesterday but with benedict, you need something more sturdy than soft bread.

Since I didn't purchase any asparagus for a side dish, I quick sauteed some thin sliced scallion and some baby spinach to put in between the poached eggs and the salmon. I used this recipe for blender hollandaise sauce, though either I used a smidge too much lemon juice or it could have used another yolk since it turned out thin. But the flavor was there so that's all that truly counts, right? 

Enough babbling, though, here was the result - isn't it pretty?

I'm definitely not going to be hungry for several hours *urp*

Profile

pseudomonas: (Default)
pseudomonas

April 2017

S M T W T F S
      1
2345678
910 1112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30      

Most Popular Tags

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated May. 28th, 2017 06:29 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios

Style Credit