jack: (Default)
[personal profile] jack
I was reflecting further on my previous comments on meta-history in source control.

One use case I imagined was that you can rebase freely, and people who've pulled will have everything just work assuming they always pull rebase. But I may have been too pessimistic. A normal pull rebase may usually just cope with the sort of rebasing people are likely to have done upstream anyway.

The other question is, are you losing old history by rebasing older commits? Well, I don't suggest doing it for very old commits, but I guess, you're not losing any history for commits that were in releases.

Although that itself raises a reason to have a connection between the new branch and the old: you shouldn't be rebasing history prior to a release much (usually not at all. maybe to squash a commit to make git bisect work?) But if you do, you don't want too parallel branches with the same commit, you want to be able to see where the release was on the "good" history (assuming there's a commit which is file-identical to the original release commit), and fall back to the "original" history only if there's some problem.

And as I've said before, another thing I like is the idea that if you're rebasing, you don't have a command that says "do this whole magic thing in one step", you have a thing that says "construct a new branch one commit at a time from this existing branch, stopping when there's a problem", and there is no state needed to continue after resolving a problem, you just re-run the command on the partially-constructed new branch. And then can choose to throw away the old branch to tidy up, but that's not an inherent part of the commadn.

Reading Wednesday

Feb. 22nd, 2017 07:37 pm
rmc28: Rachel standing in front of the entrance to the London Eye pier (Default)
[personal profile] rmc28
What I've read: poetry
[personal profile] serene mentioned the poem-a-day email from Rattle and I signed up. I don't really feel I know or understand poetry very much, but these ones have stuck with me so far:
Shoveling Snow by Vicki L. Wilson
April Rain by Abigail Rose Cargo


What I've read: short fiction
I also recently subscribed to Daily Science Fiction which gets me a short story in my email on weekdays, so even if I'm not getting to anything else, I usually manage to read that.

Shop Talk by O. Hybridity
Grandma Heloise by KT Wagner
An Invasion in Seven Courses by Rene Sears

Two more novellas from the historical romance collection Gambled Away:
Raising the Stakes by Isabel Cooper: A 1930s con-artist accidentally summons elvish help when she wins a flute in a poker game; he helps her pull off a really big con.
Redeemed by Molly O'Keefe: A former army doctor and a former spy, brought together by a really nasty character and a high-stakes poker-game in the aftermath of the US Civil War.



Acquisitions: (so far entirely eyes-bigger-than-stomach-brain)
  • Daring Greatly by Brene Brown
  • Binti: Home by Nnedi Okorafor - sequel to Binti which I enjoyed very much
  • Stories of Your Life and Others - anthology by Ted Chiang, including Story of Your Life, which has been made into the film Arrival
  • The Good Immigrant - anthology of essays by twenty British Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic writers and artists, includes this one by Riz Ahmed (played Bodhi Rook, the defecting cargo pilot in Star Wars: Rogue One; also as Riz MC was one of the artists on Immigrants (We Get The Job Done) - my favourite track from the Hamilton Mixtape)
  • Journeys - anthology of short fantasy stories
hollymath: (Default)
[personal profile] hollymath
Another e-mail I've had from Citizens UK that it will do me no good to send to my own MP, some of you might find it worthwhile though:
Tomorrow MPs will debate the Dubs Scheme in Parliament. This is the Government’s chance to do the right thing.

Email your MP and ask them to attend the debate.

For two weeks our voices have been loud and clear - from Rowan Williams to Keira Knightly to Birmingham City Council, from Aberdeen to Hammersmith - we have sent a clear message: Britain is better than this.

And we know the Government can hear us - just this weekend Theresa May agreed to review the claims of 400 refugee children. Already we have made a huge difference. But we can win bigger than this.

We need to get every single MP we can in the chamber tomorrow.


Together, if we urge our representatives to show up, we can create more pressure than ever before.
Email your MP now to ask them to go to the debate and tell the Government to keep the Dubs Scheme open.

Interesting Links for 22-02-2017

Feb. 22nd, 2017 12:00 pm
andrewducker: (Default)
[personal profile] andrewducker
ceb: (blossom)
[personal profile] ceb
Writing to peers is a bit of a faff. Well, the writing bit less so, working who to write to is the faff.

http://www.stilleu.uk/lobby-lords-brexit-bill/ is the best source of suggestions for what to write. It also has information on how to choose who to write to.

Write to a specific lord (search by name) here: https://www.theyworkforyou.com/peers/
Or use https://www.writetothem.com/lords to search by other factors - e.g. words they have mentioned in debate, or connections to a location. The other benefit of this is that you can check whether a given peer is someone who turns up to debates or not.
These both limit you to 6 emails a day (the rationale being that above that, messages will be dismissed as spam). Many peers use the general House of Commons email address and this is a convenient way to email them. The form will put in the correct form of address for you.

However, using https://www.theyworkforyou.com/peers/ you can look up email addresses, and if you find peers listing a different address, not just the HoL one, you can email them separately at that address.
http://www.parliament.uk/business/lords/whos-in-the-house-of-lords/how-to-address-a-lord/ for how to get the form of address right (NB that's Dear Lady Mobarik, frex, not Dear Lady Baroness Mobarik, not completely clear from that article).

In addition, the following are members of the government so subject to whip, and so may be less useful to write to:
Baroness Neville-Rolfe (Treasury), Baroness Williams of Trafford (HO), Baroness Joanna Shields (HO), Baroness Anelay of St Johns (FCO), Lord Keen of Elie (MoJ), Lord Nash (Education), Lord Bridges of Headley (ExEU), Lord Prior of Brampton (BIS), Lord O'Shaughnessy (Health), Lord Henley (DWP), Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon (Transport), Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth (DCLG), Baroness Evans of Bowes Park, Lord Dunlop (Scotland), Lord Gardiner of Kimble (Biosecurity), Lord Bates (int dev), Lord Ashton of Hyde (cult), Lord Taylor of Holbeach, Earl of Courtown, Baroness Mobarik, Viscount Younger of Leckie, Lord Young of Cookham, Baroness Goldie, Baroness Buscombe, Baroness Vere of Norbiton, Lord O'Shaughnessy (all whips)

Other useful links:
https://www.crowdjustice.org/case/parliament-take-control/ "Case updates" has ideas and material they've sent to all the Lords and previous stuff they sent to MPs
https://www.bindmans.com/uploads/files/documents/UK_Parliament_EU_Citizenship_rights_booklet.pdf
http://www.crossbenchpeers.org.uk/interests.html
http://lordsoftheblog.net/
hatam_soferet: (Default)
[personal profile] hatam_soferet
The Book-dragon does not hoard gold, but rather books.

They're rare, because the egg has to be incubated for a period of years, but as soon as it hatches, the larva needs access to books. This means the egg basically needs to be in a display case in a library, or in a museum that also has a book collection. Preferably in one with a dome on top, for some reason.

In the larval stage, it resembles a cranky librarian.

Over time, it gets scalier and crustier, and it develops a long tail, in which it wraps itself whilst thinking about books.

There was one at the Bodleian, at the Radcliffe Camera, whose name was "Yiddish," and it would sit on the desk, wrap itself in its tail, flash all its teeth at people, and then give advice. That was quite a young specimen. They get larger as they grow older, and more territorial.

Copyright libraries are examples of successful book-dragon hoarding. Under the copyright library, in the long-term stacks, the mature of the species is to be found, among enormous quantities of books that will never be read. The portion of the holdings accessible to readers is the bit the dragon puts out for bait; a successful library is able to build extensive collections.

The Vatican Library has a particularly old-established dragon with the most varied and valuable hoard in the world. This may be the alpha dragon of the species.

Sometimes the dragons get vicious. The Library of Alexandria had to be burned because the dragon whose hoard it was had gone bad, and there was no other way to contain the damage. The library of the Jewish Theological Seminary is ostensibly being torn down and replaced because of Manhattan real estate, but it's actually because they suspect a feral dragon, and the damage is less if you catch them early.

Interesting Links for 21-02-2017

Feb. 21st, 2017 12:00 pm
andrewducker: (Default)
[personal profile] andrewducker

My most-used tags

Feb. 21st, 2017 10:52 am
andrewducker: (Default)
[personal profile] andrewducker
Yesterday there was a discussion about which tags I used the most, and as I'm at home today waiting for a boiler engineer to give me a check-up I thought I'd have a quick play.

So I downloaded my links from Pinboard's backup page (in XML format), knocked up a quick script to split out the tags and sort them, and then dumped it into GitHub, in case anyone else wanted to play with it.

Of the 4,320 tags I've used over 30,153 links, here are the tags that have over 500 uses:
economics501
epicfail513
comics515
sex515
religion529
food532
lgbt532
art534
tv540
money554
health586
europe595
business615
children643
women692
internet709
society715
music724
scotland797
games806
law881
science899
history906
video945
movies957
psychology1223
Technology1455
usa1711
politics1922
funny2727
uk3436


Which reminds me - I've cut down on the new tags I create, having hit an LJ/DW limit - if I hit 4,000 tags then I break things, and I have 3,377 tags over there. So I've stopped adding new Via tags for anyone who I only get the occasional link through (sorry!) and I'm not creating tags for transient events. Although I am regretting not giving Brexit a tag (it's getting "Europe UK" instead. I don't regret not giving Trump a tag though...

(Some day, when I have absolutely nothing else to do, I may look at the DW tagging system internals and work out if they can be made indefinitely extensible. But today is not that day.)

Oh, and to answer the question from yesterday, OhForFucksSake has been used 327 times, making it about the 48th most popular tag. And if you want to really depress yourself, you can see them all here.

Piano

Feb. 21st, 2017 10:34 am
wildeabandon: photo of me with wavy hair and gold lipstick (Default)
[personal profile] wildeabandon
I’ve been learning the piano again, and it’s giving me a great deal of pleasure. I learned for a few years as a child, but gave up when it started getting difficult, and in the last five years or so I’ve periodically gone “I should learn to play again”, made enthusiastic attempts for a couple of weeks, and then gotten bored. About a year ago, when we were preparing for a couple of singthroughs at Ardgour-en-France, I volunteered to do the easy piano version accompaniment for a couple of the songs. It took a ridiculous amount of time to get these really quite simple pieces to a non-terrible standard, but it got me back into the habit of playing regularly again, and I’ve carried on ever since.

When I moved out to Northampton I had quite a lot of time to myself, so after a little while decided to treat myself to a cheap spare piano out here, and since then I’ve been playing a lot more, and recently started taking lessons again. I’m not someone who’s naturally musically talented, but it turns out that actually practicing a reasonable amount means you get better at a reasonable rate. Who knew? I’m preparing for my grade 5 now, and having a lot of fun with the pieces (not so much fun with the scales, of which there are many, but I do seem to find it easier to be disciplined about them than I did as a youngster).

An exciting new migraine symptom

Feb. 21st, 2017 10:23 am
rmc28: (BRAINS)
[personal profile] rmc28
I've been having more flashing-light / visual obstruction migraine auras in the last few months.  Yesterday evening I had the fingers of my right hand go temporarily numb!  Fellow migraineurs, is this a known thing?

It was about 90 minutes after I'd first seen visual disturbances. I'd taken my drugs, waited for them to work, reached the point where I couldn't see my desktop properly so left work a bit early; collected the children; made them some food so I could crash if/when the headache got really bad.  I was in the middle of making myself some food when numbness started up in my right thumb.  It  moved slowly across the hand - maybe 5-10 minutes to move completely across.  By the time the fourth finger was solidly numb, the thumb wasn't any more.  My impression is the progression was similar in speed to the way flashing lights move across my field of vision from the left side to the right, and I gather that is something to do with the neurochemical cascade of the migraine travelling across the brain.  So maybe this was too.

(My sumatriptan has been working approx 4-5 times out of 6 if I take it as soon as I notice visual disturbance.  Yesterday was one of the times it didn't. I briefly tried getting up this morning; Tony got up to do the school run assuming I wouldn't be fit to go anywhere and he turned out to be right.)

The Blood is the Life for 21-02-2017

Feb. 21st, 2017 10:00 am
miss_s_b: (Default)
[personal profile] miss_s_b
simont: (Default)
[personal profile] simont

Over the weekend, I realised, extremely belatedly, that the expression language I designed for my free-software project spigot has a grammar bug. Specifically, it's a context-dependency analogous to the C typedef bug: the same expression can parse differently depending on whether a given identifier is currently defined to be a function or a variable, which means that you need to do your scope analysis in sync with the parse, so that you can know what set of definitions is currently in scope for the subexpression you're currently looking at.

confessions, lamentations, and parser theory )

Social

Feb. 20th, 2017 07:40 pm
liv: Table laid with teapot, scones and accoutrements (yum)
[personal profile] liv
I've had a good month for seeing friends I don't spend time with often enough. I managed long phone chats with [personal profile] hatam_soferet and [personal profile] lethargic_man, and [personal profile] jack and I managed to get most of a weekend with [personal profile] doseybat and her mother and [personal profile] pplfichi, and the wonderful [personal profile] angelofthenorth came to stay with me for a few days.

I feel really really blessed by having such wonderful friends, especially when they reach out to me when I'm doing badly at keeping in touch. And several other people have got in touch too and I really do want to get back to them to make plans. And I'm not doing at all well at posting or commenting here (though I'm still reading, definitely, I haven't missed a day.)

slightly angsty )

Anyway, the only way to restart the habit of posting here is to just go ahead and do so. Have a meme which [livejournal.com profile] ghoti sensibly imported from FB: suggest a category and I'll tell you my top five things in that category. Feel free to propagate it if you think it would be a fun thing to do in your own journal.

Letters!

Feb. 20th, 2017 02:33 pm
ceb: (Default)
[personal profile] ceb
I need to get round to some letter-writing activism. If you need to also, then you are welcome at my house (in Cambridge) this evening to do so, from 8:30ish. DM me if you need the address.
wychwood: Discovery slips the surly bonds of Earth (gen - space shuttle Discovery)
[personal profile] wychwood
Things are moving super-fast! The estate agent's photographer came around last Tuesday, and on Friday three parties came to look at the house and someone (in AUSTRALIA who hasn't even SEEN it except for photos) made an offer. I just. Arglebargle. I am fundamentally unready for this, and I really want to be moved out by the time my parents go, and I'm not sure I can manage it.

(Or for the constant need to keep everything in the house just so and my bed made and curtains drawn and also originally there was supposed to be a showing at NINE AM on SATURDAY wtf although they rearranged it for Friday and it's really a lot of pressure is what I am saying!!)

Work, for a change, has been remarkably quiet; all my big ongoing projects are currently waiting for responses back from other people, and I have been scratching around for work, finishing six-month-old documentation guides, deleting my inbox down from over 1000 emails to 300-ish (it turns out I was keeping a lot of six-month-old meeting agendas, service desk receipt notifications, social event reminders, and general crap in there, mostly from lack of capacity at the time to check whether things were done with or not), and generally twiddling my thumbs in a mostly-productive fashion. Any minute now everyone is going to come back to me, and I shall be up to my neck again, but for now it's all a bit scary-ceasefire.

In the meantime, I went to see Hidden Figures with assorted friends and acquaintances, and it was amazing and just as good as I had hoped and also I cried quite a lot. I am weak for Noble Music and people being awesome ) In conclusion, I loved this, and I really for definite want to read the book now.

Anyone want to buy a bed?

Feb. 19th, 2017 12:34 pm
andrewducker: (Default)
[personal profile] andrewducker
I have a spare large bed, about a year old. Looks like this:


It's 200cmx160cm - between king-size and super-king-size. Details here.

It's got a decent sprung mattress and slats. Cost about £600 all in, will accept any kind of reasonable offer for it. Must collect.

Interesting Links for 19-02-2017

Feb. 19th, 2017 12:00 pm

Bureaucratic trauma

Feb. 18th, 2017 10:03 pm
hollymath: (Default)
[personal profile] hollymath
Chased down photo & references today, so citizenship application is DONE!

Need to sort out payment form and collect all the passports and marriage certificate and proof of passing the Life in the UK Test in a big envelope with all this. Then on Monday I can take it to the post office.

Having (extra) cake and (another) glass of wine to celebrate/destress. I didn't realize how miserable working on this today had made me until it was done.
moem: Animated pic of Little Mole reading a book (molletje leest)
[personal profile] moem
Are you calling Joe Scarborough fair,
brainy, sage, perceptive or bright?
Remember whom he gave his support
He once thought that Donald was right.
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